Archive for ‘poetry’

2013

october

There is something in October sets the gypsy blood astir; / We must rise and follow her, / When from every hill of flame / She calls and calls each vagabond by name.

Bliss Carman, “A Vagabond Song” (1896)

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2013

september

The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

John Updike, “September” in A Child’s Calendar (1965)

2013

awaiting

I am awaiting / perpetually and forever / a renaissance of wonder

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, “I Am Waiting” in A Coney Island of the Mind (1958)

2013

courage

The brave die never, though they sleep in dust:
Their courage nerves a thousand living men.

Minot Judson Savage, “Decorating the Soldiers’ Graves” (1882?)

2013

poison

Alas! they had been friends in youth;
But whispering tongues can poison truth.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Christabel” (1800)

2013

with elation

The time will come
when, with elation,
you will greet yourself arriving
at your own door, in your own mirror
and each will smile at the other’s welcome.

Derek Walcott, “Sea Grapes” (1976)

2013

live on

And thus the heart will break, yet brokenly live on.

Lord George Gordon Byron, Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Canto the Third, XXXII (1816)

2013

lost

That is the land of lost content,
I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went
And cannot come again.

A.E. Housman, “A Shropshire Lad” (1986)

2013

open every door

Not knowing when the dawn will come I open every door.

Emily Dickinson, “Dawn” in Poems, Series III (1896)

2013

another voice

For last year’s words belong to last year’s language / And next year’s words await another voice.

T.S. Eliot, “Little Gidding” (1942)

2012

at the stars

I wander’d off by myself, / In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time, / Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.

Walt Whitman, “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” in Leaves of Grass (1900)

2012

strong and content

Henceforth I whimper no more, postpone no more, need nothing, / Done with indoor complaints, libraries, querulous criticisms, / Strong and content I travel the open road.

Walt Whitman, “Song of the Open Road” (1856)

2012

peace

Lord, bid war’s trumpet cease; / Fold the whole earth in peace.

Oliver Wendell Holmes, “God Bless our Fatherland” (1910?)

2012

our sweetest songs

We look before and after / and pine for what is not / our sincerest laughter / with some pain is fraught / our sweetest songs are those that tell of saddest thought.

Percy Bysshe Shelley, “To a Skylark” (1820)

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